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art deco mirrors

Sunglasses allow better vision in bright daylight, and may protect one's eyes against damage from high levels of ultraviolet light. Typical sunglasses are darkened for protection against bright light or glare; some specialized glasses are clear in dark or indoor conditions, but turn into sunglasses when in bright light. Most sunglasses do not have corrective power in the lenses; however, special prescription sunglasses can be ordered. Specialized glasses may be used for viewing specific visual information (such as stereoscopy) or 3D glasses for viewing three-dimensional movies. Sometimes glasses with no corrective power in the lenses are worn simply for aesthetic or fashion purposes. Even with glasses used for vision correction, a wide range of designs are available for fashion purposes, using plastic, wire, and other materials. Since this hobby's inception during the 1950's, it has evolved with time. Starting across the 1960's many equipment dealers would host simple carving demonstrations at forestry expos assuring fairs as one example of the simplicity of the particular product. During the 1980's this excellent hobby received increased attention after an exhibition on the Lumberjack World Championships, which has been broadcast through the United States. Today, many new artists use the chainsaw primarily being a pre-carving tool, and finished their sculpture with smaller power carving tools and sanders. This produces a sanded wood carving which typically has more detail compared to a bit of true "chainsaw art" made using only a chainsaw. Finished pieces tend to be admired and accustomed to accentuate museums, offices, homes and street corners across the nation. We all remember traditional animation, which has been carried out with hand drawn art. A group of animators illustrated and colored the pictures on celluloid. The celluloid was transparent sheets, the place that the hand drawings were transferred. Each of these "cells", since they were called, were then photographed individually which has a super 8 or Oxford camera. Whew ! Lots of work? Well after a while, technology has allowed animators to use CGI or Computer Generated Imagery to exchange the "painful" frustrating work of the past. you may need: -standard 2B pencil (any pencil can do, whether or not this says 2B) -mechanical pencil (for fine lines) -6B or 8B pencil, for those rich dark areas -Q-tips (for shading the skin. try taking some from the cotton off the end in the Q-tip to get a more defined line) -Eraser (I would suggest a kneaded eraser. It comes in handy for your eyes and lips)