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car show at charlotte motor speedway

In 1946, the famous British economist J.R. hicks, in value and capital, developed the concept of income into a general concept of economic gain. He argues that the real purpose of computing revenues is to make people aware of the amount of money they can spend without making them poorer. Accordingly, he gave a generally accepted definition of "the maximum amount of consumption that a person can spend at the end of the term, at the same level of prosperity". Hicks's definition, though primarily for personal gain, applies to businesses as well. In the case of the enterprise, according to this definition, the enterprise income can be understood as the maximum amount that can be allocated in the enterprise cost accounting period under the same amount of capital at the end of the term and the beginning of the period. It is not obvious in some analyses, but it is important to note that economic profits include opportunity costs. The profit of an entrepreneur (normal profit) is usually positive, but economic profit can be either positive or negative (loss). That's why the opportunity cost is included: in a completely competitive market, when marginal cost equals marginal revenue, profit maximization or loss minimization conditions arise. If the market price is lower than the total average cost, which means that the economic profit is negative, the entrepreneur needs to compare the value of the loss and the average variable cost. If the business continues to operate, the negative economic profit must not be lower than the average variable cost, otherwise the entrepreneur would rather shut down the company than continue to take the loss. As hicks income concept did not specify what is called "equal wealth", and thus the income concept formed the basis of many debates concept, and the theory of accounting earnings, especially the capital preservation theory has a great influence. In accounting, people used to call "maintaining the same level of affluence" as capital preservation. Valuation bubble The social profit generated by enterprise activities is the addition of economic profit or the external economic effect of the activity. Companies may make significant monetary profits, but external economic effects often result in negative results, and substantial social profits may be minimal. Such as the industrial revolution, the mass production of the factory is low cost and price of product, but in order to earn maximum profit, factory owners and lower production costs, lead to the low wages of child labor, as well as improper handling industrial waste or contaminants and other social burden.